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• See Net Asset Value.

• See Net Asset Value.

 
 Embedded terms in definition
 Asset
Net asset value
Net
 
 Referenced Terms
 Investment trust: A closed-end fund regulated by the Investment Company Act of 1940. These funds have a fixed number of shares which are traded on the secondary markets similarly to corporate stocks. The market price may exceed the net asset value per share, in which case it is considered at a premium. When the market price falls below the Nav/share, it is at a discount. Many closed-end funds are of a specialized nature, with the portfolio representing a particular industry, country, etc. These funds are usually listed on US and foreign exchanges.Commonly known as a Closed-End Fund. Closed-end funds invest in other securities (like a Mutual Fund) but have a fixed number of shares and are traded similarly to stocks. The market price may exceed the Net Asset Value (Nav) per share, in which case the fund is selling at a Premium. When the market price falls below the NAV, the fund is selling at a Discount.

 Nav per share: The value of a mutual fund share. The Nav per share is calculated by dividing the total Net Asset Value of the fund by the number of shares outstanding.

 Net asset value: Nav is the price of a share in a mutual fund or investment company. This price is calculated once or twice daily. Net asset value is the amount by which the assets' value exceeds the company's liabilities. It is calculated by adding up the market value of all securities owned by the company, subtracting the company's liabilities, and dividing this value by the number of shares of the company outstanding. Thus, the NAV indicates the current buying or selling price of a share in an investment company.Abbreviated Nav. The value of a fund's investments. For a mutual fund, the net asset value per share usually represents the fund's market price, subject to a possible sales or redemption charge. For a closed end fund, the market price may vary significantly from the net asset value.Abbreviated Nav. The value of a Mutual Fund share calculated once a day, based on the closing market price for each security in the fund's portfolio. It is computed by deducting the fund's liabilities from the total assets of the portfolio and dividing this amount by the number of shares outstanding.Refers to the value of a share or unit of investment. It is computed by adjusting the market value of all investments by the liabilities. Then this net dollar amount is divided by the number of shares or units outstanding. Unless there are additional charges to be imposed upon redemption, the Net Asset Value becomes the bid and transaction market price. Most open end funds only calculate transactional net asset values once a day based on the closing and settlement prices.

 Net asset value: Nav is the price of a share in a mutual fund or investment company. This price is calculated once or twice daily. Net asset value is the amount by which the assets' value exceeds the company's liabilities. It is calculated by adding up the market value of all securities owned by the company, subtracting the company's liabilities, and dividing this value by the number of shares of the company outstanding. Thus, the NAV indicates the current buying or selling price of a share in an investment company.Abbreviated Nav. The value of a fund's investments. For a mutual fund, the net asset value per share usually represents the fund's market price, subject to a possible sales or redemption charge. For a closed end fund, the market price may vary significantly from the net asset value.Abbreviated Nav. The value of a Mutual Fund share calculated once a day, based on the closing market price for each security in the fund's portfolio. It is computed by deducting the fund's liabilities from the total assets of the portfolio and dividing this amount by the number of shares outstanding.Refers to the value of a share or unit of investment. It is computed by adjusting the market value of all investments by the liabilities. Then this net dollar amount is divided by the number of shares or units outstanding. Unless there are additional charges to be imposed upon redemption, the Net Asset Value becomes the bid and transaction market price. Most open end funds only calculate transactional net asset values once a day based on the closing and settlement prices.

 Net asset value: Nav is the price of a share in a mutual fund or investment company. This price is calculated once or twice daily. Net asset value is the amount by which the assets' value exceeds the company's liabilities. It is calculated by adding up the market value of all securities owned by the company, subtracting the company's liabilities, and dividing this value by the number of shares of the company outstanding. Thus, the NAV indicates the current buying or selling price of a share in an investment company.Abbreviated Nav. The value of a fund's investments. For a mutual fund, the net asset value per share usually represents the fund's market price, subject to a possible sales or redemption charge. For a closed end fund, the market price may vary significantly from the net asset value.Abbreviated Nav. The value of a Mutual Fund share calculated once a day, based on the closing market price for each security in the fund's portfolio. It is computed by deducting the fund's liabilities from the total assets of the portfolio and dividing this amount by the number of shares outstanding.Refers to the value of a share or unit of investment. It is computed by adjusting the market value of all investments by the liabilities. Then this net dollar amount is divided by the number of shares or units outstanding. Unless there are additional charges to be imposed upon redemption, the Net Asset Value becomes the bid and transaction market price. Most open end funds only calculate transactional net asset values once a day based on the closing and settlement prices.

 
 Related Terms
 Nav per share

<< Natural logarithm Nav per share >>

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